Posts Tagged ‘publishing’

Advice from a Literary Agent

March 28, 2010

I have received some extremely valuable feedback from a literary agent I know, who very kindly read my entire Allyria manuscript and e-mailed me six pages of suggestions.  All I can say is, “Wow.”  I have spent the last ten days digesting the feedback and thinking about the main comments she had and how to fix them, and I’m just about ready to dive back into the manuscript.  Here are the major pieces of advice she gave:

Show, don’t tell.  Her biggest concern was the many places in the manuscript where it was “all tell, no show.”  Everyone knows this one, right?  And yet still I made this mistake.  She provided me with numerous examples where I’ve done this.  I had already identified this as a problem as I read other books in YA (see previous posts) and the specific examples she provided will help me immensely as I re-read and edit on this next round.  Now that this has been pointed out to me, I am fully confident that I can fix this trait in my writing.  (25 years of writing and rewriting for business will help me here.)

Provide closure to the ending , even if it’s an ongoing series.  Another concern which she mentioned was the unsatisfying ending.  “Even if you are [planning a sequel/series], there needs to be more closure – most books won’t sell unless they can stand alone.”  I have spent a lot of time thinking about how I can make this more satisfying and bring a little more closure.  Yes, this is just Book I, so I can’t resolve everything at the end of this book, but I can totally bring some of what happens at the beginning of Book II and put it in Book I.  At least some more of the questions will be answered, and that will also satisfy the directive of “show, don’t tell.”

No vivid details.  Another suggestion was the lack of vivid details to bring the fantasy setting to life.  Again, lots of examples that will be so helpful.  Here’s one example she gave.  ” ‘The setting for this stage of our journey couldn’t have been more beautiful. The desert was dazzling’ can be cut, because the next sentences show us the desert’s beauty.”  Wow.   I was so worried about word count that I didn’t stop to consider whether one uninspired sentence of generic description could be replaced with two or three sentences that told how the setting impacted my narrator’s senses.  This will be a fun challenge for me to fix, as I struggle to bring the Allyria in my head to the page.

Plot inconsistencies.  The category that I appreciated the most, because it was so surprising and eye-opening for me, was the plot inconsistencies that she identified.  The first one made me laugh out loud, because I had never even considered it.  It involved a character knowing something really important, but dying and leaving only a cryptic message about it that took the MC the rest of the book to decipher.  Her point was, if this character knew this information, why didn’t she send a message to someone as soon as she learned it?  Why indeed?  This and another comment are leading me to restructure this part of the story.  More mystery, more agony, less certainty.  No one is going to know everything, and only Lex will be able to put the pieces together.  Even the advice about those inconsistencies I thought I had fixed was valuable, because perception is reality when it comes to the reader.

There were a variety of other comments, all of which I agree with and will take seriously.  The funny thing is, she didn’t mention as problems the things I was most worried about in my previous rounds of editing — pacing, cutting backstory, and word count (although she did identify a few places where I told too much and took too many words to do it).  I guess that’s good news that my previous editing apparently fixed some of these glaring problems.  Now I can move forward with the next round of edits and make the story better.

She also mentioned two strengths that really warmed my heart — she liked my strong but flawed fantasy heroine, and she liked the romance between the heroine and hero.  These are the parts of my story I liked the best too, so I’m a happy camper.

I realize I am very lucky to have someone so knowledgeable take time to read the manuscript and give me such great advice.  Now it’s time to act on it!  As I write this, I am growing excited to dive back in and tackle the manuscript again.  I’m going in!

MS is sent!

February 9, 2010

Well, I took the plunge — after cutting 8,000 words from my Allyria manuscript, going through four complete passes at reviewing, revising and editing (including eliminating unnecessary characters, giving up scenes that didn’t advance the plot, and eliminating pretty much all backstory), I have now submitted my manuscript to a literary agent.

Granted, she is someone I know well, and she asked for the whole thing, and she agreed to send me comments and tell me the truth about whether it is marketable.  I know she’s swamped and may not get to it for weeks or months.  So…I have a three-part strategy for distracting myself from my fears while I wait patiently for her response.

1)  I’m going to simultaneously widen my beta readers’ circle — I have friends who love to read, and who have been clamoring to read the manuscript for months.  I am going to print it out and have a few bound copies made.  They probably won’t be as critical as I need them to be, but it will make me feel good to share the story and characters I love with a few more people.

2)  Then there’s always Book II to write.  I am halfway done with the first draft, but I know with certainty after going through the edits of Book I that I will be eliminating a lot of what I’ve written.  Still, it will be glad to immerse myself once again in Allyria and see where my characters take me.

3)  Finally, I’ve developed a query and showed it to a few people.  I’m going to await the agent’s feedback before posting it here.

Feel free to wish me luck as I await the first real (aka from the publishing world) criticism of my manuscript.  I have received so much support already from past comments.  Thanks in advance for your thoughts.